Pharmaceutical opiates are now considered to be a more serious threat to public health than illicit drugs like heroin or cocaine. The widespread popularity of prescription analgesics like Vicodin (a combination of hydrocodone and acetaminophen), oxycodone (OxyContin), and Percocet (a combination of oxycodone and acetaminophen) has made these drugs much more accessible to Americans, many of whom obtain the drugs without a prescription. The journal Pain Physician reports that out of the 5 million Americans who admitted to abusing pain relievers in 2010, only 17 percent obtained the drugs through a legitimate prescription.
Addiction is a chronic disease characterized by drug seeking and use that is compulsive, or difficult to control, despite harmful consequences. The initial decision to take drugs is voluntary for most people, but repeated drug use can lead to brain changes that challenge an addicted person’s self-control and interfere with their ability to resist intense urges to take drugs. These brain changes can be persistent, which is why drug addiction is considered a "relapsing" disease—people in recovery from drug use disorders are at increased risk for returning to drug use even after years of not taking the drug. Kevin's Struggle with Alcohol | True Stories of Addiction | Detox to Rehab
Ideally, health professionals would be able to identify which alcoholism treatment is most effective for each person. NIAAA and other organizations are conducting research to identify genes and other factors that can predict how well someone will respond to a particular treatment. These advances could optimize how treatment decisions are made in the future.
The concept of group therapy encompasses a number of equally important goals. For example, one of the goals is to facilitate an environment in which recovering alcoholics can learn from one another. In your case, you have thoughts and experiences that could help someone else in the group. Likewise, what other people have to share could prove beneficial in your recovery. Rehab I'm Me
The Addiction Center elaborates that outpatient rehab is best for those who wish to stop abusing substances but cannot escape commitments, thereby requiring a flexible schedule. Outpatient rehab facilities will likely require patients to check in at pre-specified times for treatment. Treatment in outpatient rehab facilities can include medication and counseling. Outpatient treatment is a popular choice amongst those with less serious addictions.

Outpatient treatment may be more suitable for people who are alcohol abusers but not necessarily addicts. A good outpatient programme still employs treatments like detox, counselling, and even 12-step work. An outpatient programme should also include appropriate medical care. Remember that alcoholism is a chronic illness; it requires medical treatment.
Stimulants, such as tobacco, cocaine or prescription amphetamines, stimulate the brain and nervous system, causing increased alertness. Depressants, such as barbiturates and benzodiazepines, slow activity in the brain and nervous system, causing relaxation. Hallucinogens, such as LSD and PCP, drastically disrupt the way the brain and nervous system communicate, causing hallucinations. Rehab: Last Week Tonight with John Oliver (HBO)
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