Addiction recovery is a journey that can exhaust the mind, the body and the soul. For this reason it is of paramount importance to have your own personal space to which to retreat. Most importantly, since sleep deprivation is a common symptom of recovery the restoration of a proper and healthy sleep cycle is a major factor in alcohol addiction recovery.
People who misuse alcohol are often addicted to the act of drinking, as much as the alcohol itself. For that reason, you may need to learn skills and coping mechanisms to help you avoid alcohol once you leave a treatment center or return to familiar environments where the urge to drink may be stronger. Your doctor may refer you to a counselor or other treatment program to help you learn those skills and coping strategies. Inpatient Drug Rehab - What To Expect
Detox is not the expulsion of ‘toxins’ from your system,  but a reaction of your nervous system to the absence of alcohol. Withdrawal from alcohol and its sedative effects results in an overreaction of the nervous system. A number of severe symptoms can develop, such as disorientation, extreme anxiety, diarrhoea, very high blood pressure, delusions, heart rhythm changes etc. This is very dangerous if not supervised and monitored by personnel experienced in addiction recovery treatment. These symptoms can now be controlled in a safe way through proper medical attention and pharmacotherapy during the detox period. Our clinical staff has extensive experience dealing with alcohol detox and conducts the process in as much safety and as comforting an environment as possible. This is a vast improvement from a time before modern medicine when there was a death rate of 33% for those going through severe alcohol withdrawal.

In the 2014 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH), 20.2 million American adults reported a past-year substance use disorder, and out of this group 7.9 million (39.1 percent) also suffered from a co-occurring mental health disorder. The range of co-occurring disorders known to coincide with drug addiction is broad and includes virtually every type of mental illness recognized by the American Psychiatric Association.
Alcohol detox– In most cases of long-term alcohol addiction, detox must occur prior to formal treatment. This part of the healing process involves stopping the consumption of alcohol and all other drugs. This gives the body time to cleanse itself of all harmful toxins. Withdrawal symptoms may be an issue (e.g., depression and anxiety, mood swings, sweats, chills and irritability). They all depend upon the specifics of the addiction. Physical and mental health care and support is provided, as needed.1Therapeutic medication– The need for therapeutic medication depends on the individual patient’s needs, experiences and circumstances. If a drug is used, it should be medically-managed by a physician.
Drug addiction recovery is a long-term process, and those who attempt to overcome their drug problems must be prepared for a challenging struggle. In the end, persistence and determination will make all the difference, and if people recovering from substance use disorders are strong enough to stay the course, a happy, healthy, drug-free future will be within their grasp.
When a person receives a diagnosis of alcoholism, the next important step is getting that person to appropriate alcoholism treatment. Unfortunately, there is a variety of reasons alcoholics are reluctant to seek treatment including, the belief that therapy will not work, fear of being stereotyped and complete denial they have a problem at all. The first thing alcoholic individuals and their loved ones should understand is that alcoholism is a disease. In addition, just as some diseases cause pain, alcoholism produces responses such as fear of withdrawal and severe cravings. It is also good for alcoholics to understand that treatment can be challenging but that it is all worth it to achieve a successful recovery. Intervention by a loved one is usually a turning point for alcoholic individuals, often providing them with the motivation to seek the help they need. While it is important an alcoholic's loved ones express their support, they will also need to be firm in their insistence that the person seeks treatment.
Our medical team of addiction professionals are experienced and qualified with the use of anti-drug addiction medication. Our physicians are licensed to prescribe naltrexone methadone, suboxone, and a variety of other anti-addiction medications that have been proven effective in helping to control cravings and prevent relapse. Our clinical team recognize the benefits of pharmacotherapy and want you to get the most out of your individual and group sessions. We are proud members of the National Association of Addiction Treatment Providers (NAATP), a US based association and we adhere to the high standards embodied by the NAATP. We are also proud members of the National Association of Alcohol and Drug Abuse Counsellors (NAADAC), the largest association of addiction focused professionals in the US and Canada.

In-House Treatment Centers provide drug and alcohol rehab for individuals and their families that are suffering from moderate to severe addiction to alcohol, substance abuse, and co-occurring disorders.  As differentiated from Hospital Drug and Alcohol Rehab Programs, In-House Treatment Centers are often located in resort-style, private facilities designed to treat the whole person with a more personalized and compassionate approach to recovery.
The methamphetamine binge is followed by a phase called “tweaking,” a state characterized by restlessness, anxiety, paranoia, agitation, sleeplessness, and intense cravings. “Tweakers” may experience delusional thinking, psychotic episodes, hallucinations, and violent impulses. Severe itching and the urge to harm oneself are common at this point. Methamphetamine withdrawal is complicated by the fact that many heavy users are malnourished, dehydrated, and sleep deprived. Meth-induced psychosis can continue for weeks or months after the addict stops using. In a case study published in the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, one methamphetamine addict continued to have auditory hallucinations, fears of persecution, and paranoid delusions for a year after treatment. A rehab jail for heroin addicts
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