According to the NIAAA around 20 - 25-percent of people who receive medication and therapy will recover from alcoholism and never touch alcohol again. A further 10-percent will recover and only drink alcohol in moderation or very occasionally. Unfortunately, the relapse rate for alcoholism is high, especially in the first 12-months. This means engaging the alcoholic individual in relapse prevention therapy while in treatment is important. This should reduce the person's chances of returning to drink, once the treatment has ended. There are also other factors that can influence a person's chance of making a successful recovery and it is nothing to do with any kind of treatment. It is believed that people who are on a low-income and come from areas experiencing economic decline, are more likely to relapse than an individual who lives in an effluent area. This is because escaping stress and anxiety is one of the major reasons why people turn to drink. Worrying about money, being unemployed or potentially losing
More problematically, they are also not removed from their home environment which has proven to facilitate the drug-taking behaviour which has led to addiction, and are still able to contact their dealer/s if the temptation to relapse proves overpowering. Their whole recovery rests upon their strength of will – which in some cases may not prove sufficient at critical times.
The United States' approach to substance abuse has shifted over the last decade, and is continuing to change. The federal government was minimally involved in the 19th century. The federal government transitioned from using taxation of drugs in the early 20th century to criminalizing drug abuse with legislations and agencies like the Federal Bureau of Narcotics (FBN) mid-20th century in response to the nation's growing substance abuse issue.[47] These strict punishments for drug offenses shined light on the fact that drug abuse was a multi-faceted problem. The President's Advisory Commission on Narcotics and Drug Abuse of 1963 addressed the need for a medical solution to drug abuse. However, drug abuse continued to be enforced by the federal government through agencies such as the DEA and further legislations such as The Controlled Substances Act (CSA), the Comprehensive Crime Control Act of 1984, and Anti-Drug Abuse Acts.
Inpatient treatment programs require the patient to live at the facility for the duration—typically 30, 60, or 90 days—of treatment. The process often starts with detoxification. During this time, withdrawal symptoms are managed in a safe environment by qualified medical staff.  Medications may be administered to alleviate or prevent serious symptoms.

Getting alcohol out of the addicted person’s system is the first part of recovery. People with a severe alcohol addiction can experience intense withdrawal symptoms. A supervised alcohol detox is usually necessary for people addicted to alcohol to prevent potentially fatal complications. Shaking, sweating, seizures, and hallucinations are possible alcohol withdrawal symptoms. Woman Turns to Rehab After Struggling With Drugs, Alcohol: Part 1
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