Internationally, the U.S. and Eastern Europe are the countries with the highest substance abuse disorder occurrence (5-6%). Africa, Asia, and the Middle East were countries with the lowest worldwide occurrence (1-2%). Across the globe, those that tended to have a higher prevalence of substance dependence were in their twenties, unemployed, and men.[42] The National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) reports on substance dependence/abuse rates in various population demographics across the U.S. When surveying populations based on race and ethnicity in those ages 12 and older, it was observed that American Indian/Alaskan Natives were among the highest rates and Asians were among the lowest rates in comparison to other racial/ethnic groups.[43]
Some factors are relatively straightforward – for example, location (unless you feel that you would benefit psychologically from knowing that you are as far away as possible from your dealer/s and your drug-taking environment, it is usually best to look for a facility relatively close to you) and cost (it may be that some specifically luxury facilities are outside what is affordable for you).

For individuals addicted to prescription drugs, treatments tend to be similar to those who are addicted to drugs affecting the same brain systems. Medication like methadone and buprenorphine can be used to treat addiction to prescription opiates, and behavioral therapies can be used to treat addiction to prescription stimulants, benzodiazepines, and other drugs.[6]
Frequent meetings with an alcohol counselor are important for individuals to communicate and receive guidance during their recovery. Counseling opens a line of communication during the good times, as well as the difficult times. Your therapist will also be able to work with you on any underlying issues that may be triggering your drinking problem such as peers, family relationships, work or other circumstances. This will give you an opportunity to learn more about yourself, as well as how to keep your body healthy both inside and out.
The patient's response determines the physician's next step. If the patient denies the problem, recommending joining AA will not work. Involving the family and/or suggesting a trial of abstinence is useful, and, importantly, the physician should follow up with the patient in a few weeks. The patient might be angry initially and storm out of the office, but then the patient might recall the physician's warning months or years later and stop drinking. For patients who recognize a problem and will consider referral, the cheapest (free) and most accessible option is AA.
Exposure to other demographic groups in treatment can be an equalizing experience, demonstrating the reality of alcoholism as a universal disease. On the other hand, some patients feel more comfortable and can express themselves more effectively in settings where they can associate with their peers. Patients who are also professionals have unique stressors and needs that can be more effectively addressed in specialized programs.
Counselors help individuals with identifying behaviors and problems related to their addiction. It can be done on an individual basis, but it's more common to find it in a group setting and can include crisis counseling, weekly or daily counseling, and drop-in counseling supports. Counselors are trained to develop recovery programs that help to reestablish healthy behaviors and provide coping strategies whenever a situation of risk happens. It's very common to see them also work with family members who are affected by the addictions of the individual, or in a community to prevent addiction and educate the public. Counselors should be able to recognize how addiction affects the whole person and those around him or her.[25] Counseling is also related to "Intervention"; a process in which the addict's family and loved ones request help from a professional to get an individual into drug treatment. This process begins with a professionals' first goal: breaking down denial of the person with the addiction. Denial implies lack of willingness from the patients or fear to confront the true nature of the addiction and to take any action to improve their lives, instead of continuing the destructive behavior. Once this has been achieved, the counselor coordinates with the addict's family to support them on getting the individual to drug rehabilitation immediately, with concern and care for this person. Otherwise, this person will be asked to leave and expect no support of any kind until going into drug rehabilitation or alcoholism treatment. An intervention can also be conducted in the workplace environment with colleagues instead of family.
Whether you’re struggling with an addiction to prescription drugs, street drugs, marijuana, or other substances, we’re here to help. At The Recovery Village, we offer specialized treatment services to support you through the rehabilitation process, from detox to therapy, discharge planning, and aftercare. Call our intake counselors at any time for information about our recovery services.
The physician must state firmly, but empathically, that alcohol is a problem for the patient and that the patient determines the solution. Patients come for treatment through several means, often from a mixture of both coercion and concern. The clinician needs to understand the extent of resistance to effectively work with the patient. A good strategy is to learn about patients' goals and indicate discrepancies between their goals and their choices. Pointing out discrepancies is more effective initially than statements such as, "You have to quit," or, "You have to go to AA."
Stress, anger, frustration, self-esteem issues, depression, anxiety, trauma – all of these and more can be overwhelming to a person, driving them to seek relief of any kind from any source. Without positive coping skills to help handle issues, many turn to drugs and alcohol and, with repeated use, they spiral out of control into psychological and physical dependence. How to Get Off Opiates (Heroin, oxycodone, fentanyl) | Recovery 2.0 Protocol
The first Europeans to visit Ontario arrived by boat. French explorers Étienne Brûlé and Samuel de Champlain followed the St. Lawrence River into Lake Ontario in 1610 and 1615. Henry Hudson sailed into Ontario from the north and claimed the Hudson Bay area for Britain in 1611. Read about Ontario’s first foreign settlers from across the Atlantic. Explore French Ontario in the 17th and 18th centuries or learn about the migration of Germans to Canada. Source: https://goo.gl/KYyyCn
There is an advantage to including on-site medical care in a Drug Rehab. Physicians and nurses provide 24-hour hospital services to monitor and ensure a safe withdrawal from alcohol and other drugs. In addition, a medical staff specializing in addiction medicine can oversee the progress of each individual and make necessary adjustments to the treatment plan.
To ensure that you feel as comfortable as possible on your journey to recovery, Priory offers a free drug addiction assessment with one of our addictions experts, allowing you to discuss your concerns in confidence, receive guidance on the next steps in the drug addiction treatment process, and begin to develop an understanding of the journey that you will be taking towards drug rehabilitation and recovery. You will also undergo a consultation with a consultant psychiatrist, who will gather information on your medical and psychiatric history and advise on future treatment. We are also able to offer a comprehensive medically assisted withdrawal detoxification process for your drug addiction, if this is required.
Maintaining a small centre permits our clinical and support staff get to know each and every resident. This allows us to create highly individualised treatment plans for our residents. Our group therapy sessions are small and all-inclusive, which we strongly believe is much more effective and less overwhelming than larger institutional sessions involving a speaker and an audience.
In the precontemplation phase, the individual does not express any interest in the need for change. Many individuals with substance use problems are firmly entrenched in this stage. The options in dealing with patients in this stage are limited and include pointing out the discrepancy between patient action and patient goals, suggesting that the patient bring a family member to the next appointment, and suggesting a 2-week abstinence trial.
As discussed in part above, many of these rehab center options require that clients apply and be accepted to the programs based on certain qualifications. For free rehab, the main qualifying factor is usually a demonstrated inability to pay. Other qualifications may include residence in the state where treatment is provided, certain social qualifiers, such as being pregnant or a veteran, or being a member of the faith community that runs a faith-based rehab.

In the United States, there are many government-issued services and resources that can help with alcoholism. One of the most common, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), serves as an information hub and treatment referral service. Additionally, more states are focusing on affordable treatment options to make sure anyone who is in need of treatment receives help. Unfortunately, with an increasing demand for alcoholism treatment services, many government-funded programs have wait lists and other requirements such as financial and medical need.


Take an inventory of how you experience the craving. Do this by sitting in a comfortable chair with your feet flat on the floor and your hands in a comfortable position. Take a few deep breaths and focus your attention inward. Allow your attention to wander through your body. Notice where in your body you experience the craving and what the sensations are like. Notice each area where you experience the urge, and tell yourself what you are experiencing. For example, “My craving is in my mouth and nose and in my stomach.”
This guide is written for individuals, and their family and friends, who are looking for options to address alcohol problems. It is intended as a resource to understand what treatment choices are available and what to consider when selecting among them. Please note: NIAAA recently launched the NIAAA Alcohol Treatment Navigator. This online tool helps you find the right treatment for you — and near you. It guides you through a step-by-step process to finding a highly qualified professional treatment provider. Learn more at https://alcoholtreatment.niaaa.nih.gov.
Scholarships: Some organizations offer scholarships to help people with low incomes afford treatment. These scholarships are sometimes offered through private treatment facilities or through organizations concerned with helping those who are struggling with addiction. It is always advisable to inquire about scholarships or grants available for low-income individuals when seeking a treatment center. In some cases, SAMHSA also provides grants for treatment that can be provided through the state or treatment center. A Day in the Life of a Drug Addict *Emotional* (Part 2)
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