Don’t wait until those consequences occur; if you suspect there is a drug problem present in your loved one, talk to them and/or seek professional help if you deem that it is needed. Never let the addict downplay the seriousness of their addiction or convince you that they can change without help. Drug addiction is a disease and recovering from it is rarely as simple as just putting down the drug and being done with it for good, no matter what promises the addict in your life may make to you or how earnestly they may make those promises.
Heroin is a semi-synthetic opiate that was first developed from morphine in 1874. At the end of the 19th century, heroin was produced on a commercial basis as a possible solution to the growing problem of morphine addiction. However, it soon became apparent that heroin itself was highly addictive. In 1924, the Heroin Act made it illegal to produce, import, or possess heroin in the US. Heroin is now illegally imported from Asia, South America, and Mexico. With the rise in prescription opioid abuse, heroin has also become more popular. According to the New England Journal of Medicine, the introduction of a form of OxyContin designed to deter abuse has led to a corresponding spike in heroin abuse, as opioid addicts turn to this street drug to get the same euphoric high.
This is an ongoing debate in the medical community, but it is generally agreed that there is no one cause for the development of addiction. According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, contributing factors may include a genetic predisposition to develop addictive tendencies, an environment that is permissive of drug abuse, access to illicit substances, and certain developmental issues. The existence of a Dual Diagnosis is one of the biggest risk factors for the development of addiction. Heroin Withdrawal | First Week In
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