The National Opinion Research Center at the University of Chicago reported an analysis on disparities within admissions for substance abuse treatment in the Appalachian region, which comprises 13 states and 410 counties in the Eastern part of the U.S. While their findings for most demographic categories were similar to the national findings by NSDUH, they had different results for racial/ethnic groups which varied by sub-regions. Overall, Whites were the demographic with the largest admission rate (83%), while Alaskan Native, American Indian, Pacific Islander, and Asian populations had the lowest admissions (1.8%).[45]


After occasional use comes alcohol abuse. This stage involves more frequent use of alcohol and you may be drinking more than the recommended amount on a regular basis. You might start drinking for more than just social reasons. Maybe you are drinking alcohol to make you feel better or different. You might be using it to boost your confidence or to alleviate feelings of stress or anxiety. This can lead to a cycle of abuse and an emotional attachment to alcohol.
Drugs affect the way a person thinks, feels, behaves and how they look. But substance use disorders are often accompanied by co-occuring mental health disorders like anxiety or depression. Some people may use drugs as a form of self-medication for these issues, while other people may develop a mental health disorder after taking substances. Either way, it’s important to look out for psychological and behavioral changes in friends or loved ones who might be struggling with addiction: Drug rehabilitation
You can also augment your loved one’s ability to remain clean and sober at home by providing a positive, stress-free environment and learning how best to avoid enabling behaviors. Like the specifics of inpatient drug rehab, the treatment services chosen during aftercare should be based on the needs of the individual and the areas where they need the most support in recovery.
As important as evidence-based psychotherapy is for our addiction treatment program, it can’t be the only activity at Searidge Foundation. We schedule a wide variety of alternative therapies that help reinforce the more clinical drug rehab treatments and keep each day spent with us interesting and rewarding. This program includes Yoga, meditation, mindfulness meditation, acupuncture, Tai Chi, relaxation therapy, creative art therapy and Native healing rituals. These activities help renew the body, the mind, and the soul. And while these practices cannot cure you of a drug addiction, they can empower you with a healthy and entirely individual strength and spirit that will help you cope with life’s daily stresses and anxieties in a helpful constructive manner, rather than self medicating with drugs or alcohol.
According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, addiction is a "chronic, relapsing brain disease that is characterized by compulsive drug seeking and use, despite harmful consequences."7  There is no simple cure for addiction; however, effective treatment can help you become and stay sober.7  You will have to manage your addiction throughout your life, the same way a diabetic has to manage their condition with ongoing efforts like a proper diet and exercise.8
Scientific research since the mid-1970s shows that drug abuse treatment can help many drug-using offenders change their attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors towards drug abuse; avoid relapse; and successfully remove themselves from a life of substance abuse and crime. Many of the principles of treating drug addiction are similar for people within the criminal justice system as for those in the general population. However, many offenders don’t have access to the types of services they need. Treatment that is of poor quality or is not well suited to the needs of offenders may not be effective at reducing drug use and criminal behavior.
Detox is not the expulsion of ‘toxins’ from your system,  but a reaction of your nervous system to the absence of alcohol. Withdrawal from alcohol and its sedative effects results in an overreaction of the nervous system. A number of severe symptoms can develop, such as disorientation, extreme anxiety, diarrhoea, very high blood pressure, delusions, heart rhythm changes etc. This is very dangerous if not supervised and monitored by personnel experienced in addiction recovery treatment. These symptoms can now be controlled in a safe way through proper medical attention and pharmacotherapy during the detox period. Our clinical staff has extensive experience dealing with alcohol detox and conducts the process in as much safety and as comforting an environment as possible. This is a vast improvement from a time before modern medicine when there was a death rate of 33% for those going through severe alcohol withdrawal.
Our highly qualified treatment team possess extensive clinical experience in treating alcohol addiction, and are able to deliver a wide range of established techniques to help you to address your alcohol addiction symptoms, and resolve the underlying causes and triggers for your alcohol addiction. We ensure that each individual who seeks support with us is placed at the centre of their alcohol addiction treatment and rehabilitation journey and is involved in any decisions that are made about their care. This ensures that you benefit from a truly collaborative and personalised treatment experience and the most positive outcomes for you as an individual. Our non-judgemental, highly compassionate addiction treatment environments provide you with the ideal setting in which to address your challenges and achieve and full and sustainable recovery.
While a trial period of controlled drinking with careful follow-up might be appropriate for a diagnosis of alcohol abuse, this approach increases a physician's professional liability. Complete abstinence is the only treatment for alcohol dependence. Emphasize that the most common error is underestimating the amount of help that will be needed to stop drinking. The differential diagnosis between alcohol abuse and dependence can be a difficult judgment call.
The definition of recovery remains divided and subjective in drug rehabilitation, as there are no set standards for measuring recovery. The Betty Ford Institute defined recovery as achieving complete abstinence as well as personal well-being[21] while other studies have considered "near abstinence" as a definition.[22] The wide range of meanings has complicated the process of choosing rehabilitation programs.

NIDA recommends that any type of drug addiction treatment last at least 90 days; in fact, they find that shorter treatment lengths demonstrate limited effectiveness.11 Studies have demonstrated that the people who stay for 3 months or longer typically have better outcomes.12 So, while the initial investment of time can seem daunting, longer treatment lengths pay off.
The specific medicines prescribed will vary depending upon your own particular experience of withdrawal and the symptoms you are manifesting, and it may be that certain medications will not be appropriate depending on your substance of abuse or your own personal health history; an experienced medical professional will be able to make those decisions to ensure you go through withdrawal as safely as possible. What happens in rehab?
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