A growing literature is demonstrating the importance of emotion regulation in the treatment of substance abuse. Considering that nicotine and other psychoactive substances such as cocaine activate similar psycho-pharmacological pathways,[44] an emotion regulation approach may be applicable to a wide array of substance abuse. Proposed models of affect-driven tobacco use have focused on negative reinforcement as the primary driving force for addiction; according to such theories, tobacco is used because it helps one escape from the undesirable effects of nicotine withdrawal or other negative moods.[45] Acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT), is showing evidence that it is effective in treating substance abuse, including the treatment of poly-substance abuse and cigarette smoking.[46][47] Mindfulness programs that encourage patients to be aware of their own experiences in the present moment and of emotions that arise from thoughts, appear to prevent impulsive/compulsive responses.[45][48] Research also indicates that mindfulness programs can reduce the consumption of substances such as alcohol, cocaine, amphetamines, marijuana, cigarettes and opiates.[48][49][50]
Having 24-hour supervision, intensive care, and access to treatment are some of the major benefits of inpatient rehab, as they increase the chance of recovery. Another benefit of inpatient rehab is the change in scenery. Individuals battling drugs or alcohol, or with a co-occurring disorder, often associate a particular place or even person with the struggle. For some people, it might be their basement or the local bar. For others, it might be their “drinking buddies.” And for others, just being home alone might be enough to trigger substance use or symptoms of a particular mental health disorder.
Caring for a person who has problems with alcohol can be very stressful. It is important that as you try to help your loved one, you find a way to take care of yourself as well. It may help to seek support from others, including friends, family, community, and support groups. If you are developing your own symptoms of depression or anxiety, think about seeking professional help for yourself. Remember that your loved one is ultimately responsible for managing his or her illness.

Addiction is a chronic disease characterized by drug seeking and use that is compulsive, or difficult to control, despite harmful consequences. The initial decision to take drugs is voluntary for most people, but repeated drug use can lead to brain changes that challenge an addicted person’s self-control and interfere with their ability to resist intense urges to take drugs. These brain changes can be persistent, which is why drug addiction is considered a "relapsing" disease—people in recovery from drug use disorders are at increased risk for returning to drug use even after years of not taking the drug.
When you or someone close to you needs drug abuse rehab, it can be hard to know where exactly to find help. Without the proper help, however, substance abuse can lead to potential life-threatening situations. Additionally, drug abuse affects not only the life of the individual user but also the lives of his or her family. Fortunately, there are a variety of effective treatment methods to help individuals overcome their drug addictions.
Caring for a person who has problems with alcohol can be very stressful. It is important that as you try to help your loved one, you find a way to take care of yourself as well. It may help to seek support from others, including friends, family, community, and support groups. If you are developing your own symptoms of depression or anxiety, think about seeking professional help for yourself. Remember that your loved one is ultimately responsible for managing his or her illness.
Drugs affect the way a person thinks, feels, behaves and how they look. But substance use disorders are often accompanied by co-occuring mental health disorders like anxiety or depression. Some people may use drugs as a form of self-medication for these issues, while other people may develop a mental health disorder after taking substances. Either way, it’s important to look out for psychological and behavioral changes in friends or loved ones who might be struggling with addiction:
Research the history of the Treatment Center or facility.  What is their success rate?  Can you find any medical recommendations for them online from members of the established rehab or medical community?  How long has the Center been in operation?  Is their leadership on solid ground?  Are there any signs of financial corruption associated with the Center that is readily visible on the Internet?  It is your responsibility to dig for this information.  If you cannot find any information about a given Treatment Center online or at your local library, move on to the next Center on your list! 3 Stages of Drug Alcohol Rehab-How It Works
×